Nº. 5 of  33

My Daguerreotype Boyfriend

Where early photography meets extreme hotness

Do submit your hot photographs

There’s a storm a-coming and we’re going to have to stay warm somehow, so let’s just take a moment to step away from the Daguerreotypes and say helllloooooo to Gene Kelly. 
Hey Gene. Hey.

There’s a storm a-coming and we’re going to have to stay warm somehow, so let’s just take a moment to step away from the Daguerreotypes and say helllloooooo to Gene Kelly

Hey Gene. Hey.

(Source: latinamericana)

West Point football players Charles Love Mullins Jr. and Joseph Pescia Sullivan, 1913. (Shorpy)
Mullins survived both the First and Second World Wars, ascending to the position of Major General of the U.S. Army and living to the ripe old age of 84. Sullivan also became a Major General and died at the age of 83.

West Point football players Charles Love Mullins Jr. and Joseph Pescia Sullivan, 1913. (Shorpy)

Mullins survived both the First and Second World Wars, ascending to the position of Major General of the U.S. Army and living to the ripe old age of 84. Sullivan also became a Major General and died at the age of 83.

Dwight L. Moody, evangelical preacher. At age 18, Moody converted to evangelism while working in his uncle’s shoe store on Court Street in Boston. As a pacifist, he felt he could not enlist in the Union army, instead becoming involved with the YMCA and visiting soldiers on the front lines. Later, he would fill huge stadiums to capacity with his evangelical meetings around the U.S. and Europe.
Submitted by P. Allan

Dwight L. Moody, evangelical preacher. At age 18, Moody converted to evangelism while working in his uncle’s shoe store on Court Street in Boston. As a pacifist, he felt he could not enlist in the Union army, instead becoming involved with the YMCA and visiting soldiers on the front lines. Later, he would fill huge stadiums to capacity with his evangelical meetings around the U.S. and Europe.

Submitted by P. Allan

From the submitter Carl Rhodes:



R. F. Jameson, who was a month short of his twentieth birthday when he sat before an unknown daguerreotypist’s camera in Montrose, Pennsylvania, in October 1846.
Source: Dennis A. Waters Fine Daguerreotypes, Exeter, New Hampshire,  www.finedags.com



Anyone have an idea what Mr. Jameson is sitting next to? Is that a lamp?
UPDATE: Sources say it’s a microscope! Yay science! Here’s more information via shegetsby.

The microscope, undoubtedly Jameson’s prize possession, and rarely depicted in a daguerreotype, emphatically conveys his calling or avocation.

From the submitter Carl Rhodes:

R. F. Jameson, who was a month short of his twentieth birthday when he sat before an unknown daguerreotypist’s camera in Montrose, Pennsylvania, in October 1846.

Source: Dennis A. Waters Fine Daguerreotypes, Exeter, New Hampshire,  www.finedags.com

Anyone have an idea what Mr. Jameson is sitting next to? Is that a lamp?

UPDATE: Sources say it’s a microscope! Yay science! Here’s more information via shegetsby.

The microscope, undoubtedly Jameson’s prize possession, and rarely depicted in a daguerreotype, emphatically conveys his calling or avocation.

Lookin’ good, Leo.
theparisreview:

“I’ve fallen in love or imagine I have; went to a party and lost my head. Bought a horse which I don’t need at all.” —Leo Tolstoy, January 25, 1851

Lookin’ good, Leo.

theparisreview:

“I’ve fallen in love or imagine I have; went to a party and lost my head. Bought a horse which I don’t need at all.” —Leo Tolstoy, January 25, 1851

Those are some choice last words, Captain Oates. And a great sweater to boot. 
From submitter laurielover1912

This is Captain Lawrence Oates, a member of Captain Scott’s doomed Antarctic expedition of 1910-1912. Oates was a cavalry officer who was in charge of the ponies on the expedition. I’ve had a huge historical crush on him for years and have him to blame for my username. Oates is best remembered for walking out into the blizzard to his death when he couldn’t continue due to the pain he was in, thereby giving his friends more chance of pulling through (sadly they didn’t). Just before leaving the tent, he famously spoke the words: ‘I’m just going outside and may be some time.’ The epitome of the competent but reserved English hero, he was also one very fine looking man.

Those are some choice last words, Captain Oates. And a great sweater to boot. 

From submitter laurielover1912

This is Captain Lawrence Oates, a member of Captain Scott’s doomed Antarctic expedition of 1910-1912. Oates was a cavalry officer who was in charge of the ponies on the expedition. I’ve had a huge historical crush on him for years and have him to blame for my username. Oates is best remembered for walking out into the blizzard to his death when he couldn’t continue due to the pain he was in, thereby giving his friends more chance of pulling through (sadly they didn’t). Just before leaving the tent, he famously spoke the words: ‘I’m just going outside and may be some time.’ The epitome of the competent but reserved English hero, he was also one very fine looking man.

michellelegro:

Any Daguerreotype BF worth his salt loves his dog. 
tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1860-80’s, [tintype self-portrait of photographer E.A. Scholfield in a rocking chair, cradling a dog], E.A. Scholfield
via Connecticut History Online, Mystic Seaport, Scholfield Collection

michellelegro:

Any Daguerreotype BF worth his salt loves his dog. 

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1860-80’s, [tintype self-portrait of photographer E.A. Scholfield in a rocking chair, cradling a dog], E.A. Scholfield

via Connecticut History Online, Mystic Seaport, Scholfield Collection

Portrait of an unidentified man (c. 1844-1860) by Matthew Brady’s studio (Library of Congress)
Just one of the beautiful decayed daguerreotypes featured at The Public Domain Review

Portrait of an unidentified man (c. 1844-1860) by Matthew Brady’s studio (Library of Congress)

Just one of the beautiful decayed daguerreotypes featured at The Public Domain Review

Henry Adams, age 20, 1858, at his Harvard graduation.
The grandson of John Quincy Adams (and the great-grandson of founding father John Adams), during the civil war Henry Adams was private secretary to his father, a Congressman in the House of Representatives.
His influential circle of friends was known as “The Five of Hearts,” and included Lincoln’s secretary John Hay. He later became friends with Walt Whitman, Rudyard Kipling, Teddy Roosevelt, and many others.  
We highly suggest Patricia O’Toole’s biography The Five of Hearts for more on this gregarious studmuffin.
Submitted by Mary Mann

Henry Adams, age 20, 1858, at his Harvard graduation.

The grandson of John Quincy Adams (and the great-grandson of founding father John Adams), during the civil war Henry Adams was private secretary to his father, a Congressman in the House of Representatives.

His influential circle of friends was known as “The Five of Hearts,” and included Lincoln’s secretary John Hay. He later became friends with Walt Whitman, Rudyard Kipling, Teddy Roosevelt, and many others.  

We highly suggest Patricia O’Toole’s biography The Five of Hearts for more on this gregarious studmuffin.

Submitted by Mary Mann

thewriterwiner says:


This is my great-grandfather. He was born in 1876, and he was maybe in his 20s here, so I’d date the photo around early 1900s. He was a performer in Vaudeville (so I’ve been told), and he was born in a small town in New Hampshire. Both his parents were French-Canadians.


Thanks for the sexy strongman!

thewriterwiner says:

This is my great-grandfather. He was born in 1876, and he was maybe in his 20s here, so I’d date the photo around early 1900s. He was a performer in Vaudeville (so I’ve been told), and he was born in a small town in New Hampshire. Both his parents were French-Canadians.

Thanks for the sexy strongman!

Nº. 5 of  33