Nº. 4 of  33

My Daguerreotype Boyfriend

Where early photography meets extreme hotness

Do submit your hot photographs

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, c. 1900, in his early thirties. This handsome Scot was responsible for some of the most beautiful design of the Arts & Crafts movement in the UK. His artistic temperament can be seen in the devil-may-care tying of his cravat.
Submitted by thenewmessiah

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, c. 1900, in his early thirties. This handsome Scot was responsible for some of the most beautiful design of the Arts & Crafts movement in the UK. His artistic temperament can be seen in the devil-may-care tying of his cravat.

Submitted by thenewmessiah

Lew Wallace, c. 1853, in his mid-twenties. Union general, governor of New Mexico territory, diplomat to the Ottoman Empire, where he gathered material for the bestselling Ben-Hur (which Ulysses S. Grant reportedly read in a single 30-hour sitting.)
From the submitter cmcdwh: 



This handsome fellow is my great-great-grandfather, Lew Wallace, around 1853. The daguerreotype was taken around 1853 and is owned by the General Lew Wallace Study in Crawfordsville, Indiana. By the time he was a Major-General in the Civil War, Lew had grown an impressive beard, but I like him better this way. Lew sat on the military tribunal that tried another daguerreotype boyfriend, Lewis Thornton Powell. [Ed: Gasp!]

Lew Wallace, c. 1853, in his mid-twenties. Union general, governor of New Mexico territory, diplomat to the Ottoman Empire, where he gathered material for the bestselling Ben-Hur (which Ulysses S. Grant reportedly read in a single 30-hour sitting.)

From the submitter cmcdwh

This handsome fellow is my great-great-grandfather, Lew Wallace, around 1853. The daguerreotype was taken around 1853 and is owned by the General Lew Wallace Study in Crawfordsville, Indiana. By the time he was a Major-General in the Civil War, Lew had grown an impressive beard, but I like him better this way. Lew sat on the military tribunal that tried another daguerreotype boyfriend, Lewis Thornton Powell. [Ed: Gasp!]

Bird Rattle, Piegan tribe, ca. 1910. Photographed by Edward S. Curtis. According to The Atlantic:


Curtis secured funding from J.P. Morgan, and visited more than 80 tribes over the next 20 years, taking more than 40,000 photographs, 10,000 wax cylinder recordings, and huge volumes of notes and sketches.

Bird Rattle, Piegan tribe, ca. 1910. Photographed by Edward S. Curtis. According to The Atlantic:

Curtis secured funding from J.P. Morgan, and visited more than 80 tribes over the next 20 years, taking more than 40,000 photographs, 10,000 wax cylinder recordings, and huge volumes of notes and sketches.

From submitter Chris Black:
Written on the back of this photo is written “Velma I Love You, Fred”  Velma was my grandmother. I have no idea who Fred was.

From submitter Chris Black:

Written on the back of this photo is written “Velma I Love You, Fred”  Velma was my grandmother. I have no idea who Fred was.

The recent discovery of an unpublished D.H. Lawrence letter proves that he’s got your back, ladies. Writing in response to a misogynistic 1924 article titled “The Ugliness of Women,” Lawrence lay down the law: 


The hideousness {the author] sees is the reflection of himself, and of the automatic meat-lust with which he approaches another individual…Even the most “beautiful” woman is still a human creature. If {the author] approached her as such, as a being instead of as a piece of lurid meat, he would have no horrors afterwards. 


Thank you D.H. Lawrence, meat-lust warrior. (h/t Jezebel)

The recent discovery of an unpublished D.H. Lawrence letter proves that he’s got your back, ladies. Writing in response to a misogynistic 1924 article titled “The Ugliness of Women,” Lawrence lay down the law: 

The hideousness {the author] sees is the reflection of himself, and of the automatic meat-lust with which he approaches another individual…Even the most “beautiful” woman is still a human creature. If {the author] approached her as such, as a being instead of as a piece of lurid meat, he would have no horrors afterwards. 

Thank you D.H. Lawrence, meat-lust warrior. (h/t Jezebel)

My Daguerreotype Boyfriend is featured in this week’s New York Times Magazine. Check it out on The One-Page Magazine, alongside the beautiful illustration above. 
michellelegro:

And I couldn’t be happier to have my name below such a sweet illustration. Thanks Kyle!
flannelanimal:

I couldn’t be happier with this recent, tiny illustration for The New York Times Magazine’s One Page Magazine.It accompanied a small article about “My Daguerrotype Boyfriend”, the awesome Tumblr of old-timey heartthrobs.  

My Daguerreotype Boyfriend is featured in this week’s New York Times Magazine. Check it out on The One-Page Magazine, alongside the beautiful illustration above. 

michellelegro:

And I couldn’t be happier to have my name below such a sweet illustration. Thanks Kyle!

flannelanimal:

I couldn’t be happier with this recent, tiny illustration for The New York Times Magazine’s One Page Magazine.It accompanied a small article about “My Daguerrotype Boyfriend”, the awesome Tumblr of old-timey heartthrobs.  

(Source: kylehiltonillustration)

Samuel Clemens (a.k.a Mark Twain), age 15, 1850. Daguerreotype taken when he was a printer in Hannibal, Missouri. 
Check out that baller belt-buckle! Are you as cool as fifteen-year-old Sam?
Update: That’s not a buckle! From a reader on Facebook: “He’s holding, with his right hand on its pistol grip (remember, these images are reversed), a typesetter’s composing stick, in which the metal type for his name are inserted, ready to print. He was smart enough to know that the image would be reversed, and thus show correctly in the photo!”

Samuel Clemens (a.k.a Mark Twain), age 15, 1850. Daguerreotype taken when he was a printer in Hannibal, Missouri. 

Check out that baller belt-buckle! Are you as cool as fifteen-year-old Sam?

Update: That’s not a buckle! From a reader on Facebook: “He’s holding, with his right hand on its pistol grip (remember, these images are reversed), a typesetter’s composing stick, in which the metal type for his name are inserted, ready to print. He was smart enough to know that the image would be reversed, and thus show correctly in the photo!”

michellelegro:

Sometimes your Daguerreotype boyfriend might be a Daguerreotype girlfriend. 
explore-blog:


Women lived in germ-ridden camps, languished in appalling prisons, and died miserably, but honorably, for their country and their cause just as men did.

The untold stories of women who dressed and served as men in the Civil War

michellelegro:

Sometimes your Daguerreotype boyfriend might be a Daguerreotype girlfriend. 

explore-blog:

Women lived in germ-ridden camps, languished in appalling prisons, and died miserably, but honorably, for their country and their cause just as men did.

The untold stories of women who dressed and served as men in the Civil War

(Source: )

It’s a colorized Lewis Powell! And we’re just fine with that…

It’s a colorized Lewis Powell! And we’re just fine with that…

Second Lt. James G. Sturgis. Killed in action at Little Big Horn.
Cumberbatch, is that you?
Submitted by thefutileprecaution

Second Lt. James G. Sturgis. Killed in action at Little Big Horn.

Cumberbatch, is that you?

Submitted by thefutileprecaution

Nº. 4 of  33